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New blog post: newspaper coverage for Cataline book

I really appreciated being interviewed the Quesnel Cariboo Observer Lindsay Chung earlier this year. Lindsay is away from her editor’s post for a while.

A quote from the 22 July 2020 issue of the Quesnel Cariboo Observer issue says, “At the start of the pandemic, Cariboo Observer editor Lindsay Chung — also a Canadian Ranger — was summoned for active duty. Chung answered that call for assistance from the Canadian Rangers but is expected to be back at her editor’s chair in September.” I knew Lindsay was an impressive young woman, she was a great interviewer.

To read Lindsay’s original article, click here.

I was also really honoured to have my book reviewed in the Vancouver Sun, and apparently, the review got syndicated to a lot of other newspapers as well. Tom Sandborn, the author of the review, said: “Cataline would be an ideal protagonist for an adventure movie. His long hair and beard, the Mexican throwing knife tucked into his boot, his broken English, and his extraordinary skill at training and using pack animals over rugged terrain all made him a colourful and memorable figure.”

To read the whole review, click here. I’d only read the review online so I was very pleased when someone (OK, it was my mom) gave me an actual physical newspaper with the review. Here I am (below), proudly holding up a copy of the review. For an author, a review means so much! So if you want to help out any author, leave a review on your own blog, or on Amazon or on Goodreads. It costs nothing and means the world to people who write books. I have to say that the review on my Amazon page is unusual, but appreciated nevertheless!

Book review: Packer Cataline a strong and reliable B.C. pioneer. Reviewed in The Vancouver Sun, July 3, 2020. Review by Tom Sandborn.
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New Blog Post: radio interview on CBC’s Daybreak North

If you’re up and about on Monday July 20, I will be on CBC’s Daybreak North at 8:15 am discussing the book ‘Cataline: The Life of BC’s Legendary Packer’. I’m looking forward to my interview with Wil Fundal so tune in to 91.5 FM.

Edit UPDATE, July 20: Here’s a link to the interview in case you missed it:

I was on @daybreaknorth this morning to talk about the life of famous mule train packer, CATALINE https://cbc.ca/listen/live-radio/1-109/clip/15787990… (starts at 51:45)

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New blog post: BC Bestseller List

I was so happy to see that the book “Cataline: The Life of BC’s Legendary Packer” debuted on the May 16 BC Bestseller List.

To be in such company as Robert Budd, Roy Henry Vickers, Richard Wagamese, Ken Mather and many more, is a true honour.

Now, nine weeks later, the book is still on the list and has fluctuated up and down, currently at #5.

The BC Bestseller list is compiled by Read Local BC, “which is a project from the Association of Book Publishers of BC that celebrates the vibrant community of authors, publishers, bookstores, and libraries that make up our province’s literary landscape.”

Thank you to everyone who purchased this book, thank you also to the booksellers and to Caitlin Press staff who have done such a great job of promotion, as well.

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New Blog Post: Cataline’s Last Days

Jean ‘Cataline’ Caux lived a full and varied life in the new province of British Columbia. After running pack trains up and down the province for more than 50 years, Cataline retired to Hazelton to live out his days.

He had many friends there, and they looked after him. These were the days before pensions and universal health care. However, Cataline was lucky to be in Hazelton because there was a subscription service (a form of health insurance) to the Hazelton Hospital.

A new book, ‘Service on the Skeena: Horace Wrinch, Frontier Physician’ by Geoff Mynett mentions Cataline (page 250):

“The old packer Cataline died in 1922. He had always said that he did not like hospitals and that people only went there to die. Despite such talk, though, he had in fact contributed to the hospital’s appeals for donations over the years. He had resisted going there for as long as he could. His friend Sperry Cline took him eventually, grumbling, and groaning an, and there he did die.”

“They buried him in the cemetery on top of the bluff. Horace and Cataline were hardly friends, but Cataline was a link to the distant pass, to the days when Hazelton was cut off from the outside world for four or five months of the year. H was, moreover, a link to the gold rush days of the middle of the previous century.”

Find A Grave, an online collection of gravesites and cemeteries, has a listing for Cataline. He is buried in Gitanmaax Cemetery in Hazelton, British Columbia.

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New blog posts: Cataline books in hand!

After looking longingly of pictures of the cover of “Cataline: The Life of BC’s Legendary Packer” online, I was happy to receive a box of my books last month. It’s been really fun to sell them to friends and family and to people who have been following me on social media for a while and waiting patiently for the book to be ready.

If you are in the Quesnel area and want a personalized copy, let me know. I can also mail signed copies within Canada for $24 (includes tax) plus postage. Your favourite local bookstore can also order the book for you. Canadian customers can also order the book directly from Caitlin Press. For international customers, the book can be purchased from the usual online retailers.